Archive for the ‘Sanborn Western Camps’ Category

Meet The Outdoor Play #GNO Twitter Party Panelists…proving that play trumps politics any day!

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

Visit www.momitforward.com to learn more about #GNO!

Tonight, from 9-11 p.m. EST (7-9 p.m. MST), Sanborn Western Camps is sponsoring a #GNO Twitter Party with host Mom It Forward about the Benefits of Outdoor Play for Kids (and Adults!).

The Twitter hashtag #gno stands for “Girls (& Guys!) Night Out”.  Once you are on Twitter, do a search on the hashtags #gno and #sanborncamps to join the chat or follow the chat and tweet using Tweetgrid.  This promises to be a very informative, fun conversation with folks from all over the country.  It will get you pumped up to get your whole family outside this weekend (and maybe even tomorrow morning)  as well as give you information about the importance of play, summer camp, the Children in Nature movement, educational trends, and much, much more!

As some additional motivation to stop by, Sanborn Western Camps is giving away a full Sanborn Junior tuition (or a 1/2 tuition for the full term) for summer 2012 or 2013,  based on availability.  Visit momitforward.com for more details on how to enter.

We wanted to take a moment to thank all of our panelists for tonight’s #gno party.  They are incredible people to follow on Twitter and in the blogosphere.  We look forward to their insights and contributions during tonight’s event.  Play on!

Our tremendous panelists include:

@acacamps The American Camp Association (formerly known as the American Camping Association) is a community of camp professionals who, for nearly 100 years, have joined together to share our knowledge and experience and to ensure the quality of camp programs. Because of our diverse 7,000 plus membership and our exceptional programs, children and adults have the opportunity to learn powerful lessons in community, character-building, skill development, and healthy living — lessons that can be learned nowhere else. Dawn Swindle, head of ACA Publications (both print and web) will be tweeting using @acacamps and also @acacampparents during tonight’s #gno Twitter party.  With her years at ACA, and as a long time camp professional, Dawn is a great resource for parents and camp professionals alike.  Learn more about ACA and their rigorous camp accreditation process by visiting www.acacamps.org.

@acacampparents CampParents.org is a comprehensive summer camp resource for families—offering expert advice from camp professionals on camp selection, readiness, child and youth development, and issues of importance to families. ACA helps you find the right camp for every child.  Learn more about ACA and use the impressive camp finder tool at www.campparents.org.

@activekidsclub Kari Svenneby is not a professional tree hugger, though she is a proud wildcrafter and self-proclaimed “Polar Bear Mother.”  She is an urban mother, librarian and classically trained chef championing the benefits exposure to nature gives children.  She is so passionate about getting kids outside, Kari made it is her business. When looking for inspirational ideas about the natural world in magazines and online she found very little. Her passion turned into a business idea. She has set out to make an exciting website connecting children with nature for adults and kids.  Thus activekidsclub.com was born.  Kari is a “love refuge” from Norway who speaks 6 languages, and her posts and tweets offer a unique cultural perspective on natural play that are not to be missed.

@banteringblonde Fiona Bryan is a techno-goddess.  She blogs about social media and all things “banter-worthy” at Banteringblonde.com, was a 2009 Top #50 Tweeple on PRSarahEvans.com, and writes regularly for the popular blog Technorati.  Her passion for motivating and empowering women to be positive role models for their families led her to found MomActive in early 2009.  Momactive is a multi-media outreach initiative that includes a weekly Blog Talk Radio program, MomTV live stream video program, and the MomActive.com community and blog.  Fiona hope to check off a bucket item list sometime this spring when she takes a trip down The Nature Place’s zipline with her friend, Ariella Rogge from @sanborncamps.  As a former camper and current Director of Marketing and Public Relations for New England Music Camp (@nemusiccamp), Fiona appreciates and understands the growth and wisdom that comes from a summer camp experience.

@ChildrenNature The Children & Nature Network (C&NN) was created to encourage and support the people and organizations working nationally and internationally to reconnect children with nature. The network provides a critical link between researchers and individuals, educators and organizations dedicated to children’s health and well-being.  Typically hosted by Suz Lipman ( see below for more info about @slowfamily) who is a writer, blogger at www.slowfamilyonline.com, soapcrafter, jammaker, hiker, retro-enthusiast, and who claims she will work for peace, justice & cheese.  For @ChildrenNature, Suz shares incredible information, research, and cutting edge ideas with parents, educators, researchers, camps and like-minded organizations who are passionate about getting kids outdoors. 

@GoExploreNature Debi Huang is a Los Angeles-based wife, mom and adventure guide for two young boys.  Her blog, Go Explore Nature, is a place for her to share her family’s nature adventures. She hopes to inspire you to get your family outside, too. She has weekly reviews of nature adventures (her recent holiday beach trip was a favorite of the frigid mountain set); she also shares stories, inspirations and lessons learned from nature; and she has THE cure for the #FF blues: “Fun Friday” activities that feature simple ways to connect your kids with the natural world (reader favorites include a winter scavenger hunt and taking a color walk.)  She is a prolific blogger and an anchor in the Children in Nature movement.  But our favorite thing about Debi?  She has been writing letters (REAL MAIL!!) to her Big Explorer and Little Explorer since before they were born.

@hoo_dee_hoo Meredith Sinclair is a Chicago-land mother hung up her teacher hat after having kids, started a blog to “find” her writing voice, and now writes and vlog on her own site and Chicagoparent.com about daily life as a full-time mom of two young boys and the challenge of maintaining her vengeful girlie side in a home fueled by undistilled testosterone.  She believes PLAYtime is vital to our health and well being…not to mention it makes us all WAY less grumpy…however, if you ARE feeling grumpy, you should just take a moment to watch Meredith talk about the game Pajaggle in her Holiday Play-list post.  Her enthusiasm, and great ideas, are contagious!

@ImaginationSoup Melissa Taylor is a freelance writer, an award winning educational blogger at ImaginationSoup.net, an award winning teacher with a M.A. in Education, the Book Editor-at-Large for Colorado Parent Magazine and a parent of two children, ages 5 and 8. As a teacher, she won Outstanding Teacher in Douglas County Schools. She worked or the non-profit P.E.B.C. as an instructional coach and trainer and hosted groups of teachers in her classroom for learning labs.  Taylor understands instruction, literacy, assessment, differentiation, learning styles, multiple intelligences, learning disabilities and curriculum. Taylor hopes Imagination Soup will gives parents plenty of ideas to keep their kids learning every day…mostly by keeping learning fun and playful!

@JylMomIF Jyl Johnson Pattee lives, works, and breathes a special kind of magic.  As the founder of MomItForward.com, Jyl combines a passion for communication and people, and she launched the site in 2008 with the mission to “change the world one mom at a time.”  We think the concept is a perfect use for value-added social media (and a great metaphor for human relations all the way around)—great ideas are TOO great not to be shared.  She is THE hostess of the weekly #gno parties on Twitter, which started in September 2008. Jyl is known as a “connector” who brings good ideas and people together both on and offline to make a positive impact for causes and brands through education and sharing of experiences.  Jyl is also a tremendous mother to two active boys, an intrepid traveler, the creator of the EVO conference, a wonderful writer, an occasionally irreverent wife to Troy, and a great friend to any parent online.  Please take the time to visit her and learn more about Jyl, the EVO conference, the Mom It Forward movement, #gno and much, much more at www.momitforward.com.

@kaboom KaBOOM! is the national non-profit dedicated to saving play. Children today spend less time playing outdoors than any previous generation, a fact that is having disastrous consequences on their health, achievement levels, and overall well-being. To fight this play deficit, social entrepreneur Darell Hammond founded non-profit KaBOOM! in 1996 in Washington, D.C. with a vision of creating a great place to play within walking distance of every child in America. Since then, KaBOOM! has mapped over 89,000 places to play, built more than 2,000 playgrounds, and successfully advocated for play policies in hundreds of cities across the country. KaBOOM! also provides communities with online tools to self-organize and take action to support play on both a local and national level. Hammond chronicles the founding of the organization and the importance of the cause of play in his The New York Times Best Seller KaBOOM!: How One Man Built a Movement to Save Play. The book details how businesses and communities can work together to save play for children across the country. All author proceeds support KaBOOM!. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., KaBOOM! also has offices in Chicago and San Mateo, Calif. For more information, visit www.kaboom.org.

@sanborncamps Ariella Rogge, Program Director/Assistant Director/Outdoor (and indoor) Educator/Social Media Junkie/Mom of Two Boy Wonders/Toilet Plunger, manages the @sanborncamps Twitter account both day (and more consistently) by night.  Ariella has been involved in some capacity (see “Toilet Plunger”) at Sanborn Western Camps since she was 12.  She is a true believer in the transformational power of the camp experience for all children because for her, like Richard Louv (author of “Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder) says, “The woods were my Ritalin. Nature calmed me, focused me, and yet excited my senses.”  She would love to answer any questions you might have about summer camp (or help direct you to the right person!)—either at Sanborn or anywhere else—feel free to email her at ariella at sanbornwesterncamps dot com.

@slowfamily “Slow down. Enjoy lost arts and each other. Trade frenzy for fun.”  Suz Lipman’s About Slow Family page is about as far from a traditional bio as one can get…and that is exactly as it should be.  Conceived to connect to that part of ourselves and our families that somehow got lost in the shuffle of our busy lives, the Slow Movement speaks to all of us who have had enough:  “Enough” to super-parenting and consumerism and running around (“racing to yoga”, as it were) and not being happy anyway. As Suz says, the Slow Movement is really about having more fun. It’s also about being authentic, deciding what’s really important, restoring a sense of wonder, appreciating and helping one other, and taking time to enjoy and honor life’s simple pleasures in the relatively short time we’re all here together.  Amen to that!

@TroyPattee Troy Pattee is a Man Among Women.  Troy is THE “G” in #GNO.  Troy’s wife, Jyl, founded the Twitter #GNO (Girls Night Out) party—and has brought her affable “Guy” with her to every event.  @sanborncamps first connected on Twitter with Troy—and later with Jyl—because he has an unnerving propensity to be skiing EXACTLY when we wish WE were skiing (and, we’ll admit it, sometimes the snow IS better in Utah).  Troy has a fabulous blog called Dadventurous.com where he will be sharing tales and adventures with other like minded dads…and—knowing Troy–probably moms, too.  Check out the blog at www.dadventurous.com and hang with him during the weekly Tuesday night #gno Twitter parties.

@windycitymomma Renee Keats is an urban mom living in the suburbs who defies classification, writes thoughtful blog posts about her adventures in (and out) of her neighborhood (which she calls Utopia/Pleasantville) that can be found at Windy City Momma.  She lives in Pleasantville with her husband, daughter (K), and a wickedly funny cat named Sabine who has changed family dog’s (Maya) name to “Beast.”  She loves having green space, growing a mostly organic garden and quotes from John Hughes movies almost as much as a circa 1987 Big Spring camper.

Saunter [Part One]

Monday, January 23rd, 2012
Still winter. Snow like Huckleberry Finn is lathering on a new coat of paint over the world.

Most campers don’t get to experience the beautiful desolation that is the Sanborn off season. So here’s part one of ‘saunter,’ a video series reflecting our ephemeral seasons on the ranch and throughout the back country.

“Do you know the origin of that word ‘saunter?’ It’s a beautiful word. Away back in the Middle Ages people used to go on pilgrimages to the Holy Land, and when people in the villages through which they passed asked where they were going, they would reply, “A la sainte terre,’ ‘To the Holy Land.’ And so they became known as sainte-terre-ers or saunterers. Now these mountains are our Holy Land, and we ought to saunter through them reverently, not ‘hike’ through them.”

-John Muir quoted by Albert Palmer in “A Parable of Sauntering”

Camper Stories

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

We are already gearing up for another amazing summer! As we think about the adventures we’ll be having, it is fun to reflect on some trips from last summer.

Hi everybody. My name is Emma and this is my second year coming to Sanborn. I climbed my first mountain EVER last Monday and Tuesday. It was Mount Ouray. It was very difficult, but a great experience. We summitted after 9 hours of hiking and rock scrambling. The view from the top was unbelievably beautiful. There is no way that anyone who has not climbed a mountain understands what it’s like – it’s amazing! Long trips start today for some people, but mine starts tomorrow. I am climbing my second mountain, Pikes Peak, as a 4-day trip. Camp is going by so quickly and it is so much fun! Sanborn is the best summer camp ever!         – Emma Williams

Last week was SOLE for us freshmen. I was in the Colorado Trail / Belford group. We spent three days hiking the Colorado Trail, which was gorgeous. One Wednesday we were driven to the base of Oxford-Belford where we hiked up a trail for 1.5 miles with pickaxes and shovels. The next day we hiked another 2 miles to our trail work site where we moved rocks to cover up a false trail. The work was probably the hardest thing I’ve ever done. However, it was completely worth it when we looked down at our work and saw what a difference we made.        – Carly

The food here is very delicious and there is a lot of variety. It doesn’t matter if you are vegetarian, vegan, or whatever, the Sanborn kitchen will have something for you! The kitchen staff put out peanut butter and a salad bar, and oatmeal for breakfast, besides what is served on the tables. YUM! Sanborn gives us healthy and good meals! We have water, tea, juice, and milk to drink – no sodas (unless sometimes bought at the store). At the end of lunch and dinner there are desserts, like cookies or brownies or other yummy stuff! There is no better place to get food than the Sanborn Kitchen!       – Raquel

High Trails Blog Project Profile #1: Harriet “Hallie” Hargrave

Friday, January 20th, 2012

Opening Campfire, 1st Term 2005 from L: Julie Richardson, Elizabeth Rundle, Chelsea Neidenthal, Alexis Harrell, Erica Le Grand, Harriet Hargrave, Ariella Rogge, Carlotta Avery

Hallie (Harriet) Hargrave was nominated by her former camper, Anna Mae Maloney Gill.  Anna Mae was a High Trails camper from 1998-1992 and has “carried the values and confidence I gained as a camper with me in every new experience I have since faced.”  She is married and has four young children: one five year old boy, and three young daughters, ages 3, 2, and 7 months.  In her former, pre-child life, she was a high school teacher and an attorney

Tell us why you are nominating Harriet: Hallie was my counselor my third year at Sanborn, the summer of 1990.  I was twelve years old and totally unsure of myself and my place in the world.  Hallie was a true individual.  She could talk to anyone, had a wonderful way of relating to pre-teens, and was truly comfortable in her own skin.  Hallie taught me more that summer about self-confidence than I believe I have learned since (and I am now 34).  She remained my friend and confidant long after our weeks at Sanborn ended, as we remained in touch through the mail for many years after.  I now have three little girls of my own, who hopefully will someday share in the Hightrails experience.  I hope, and in my heart trust, that they will, have their own Hallie.” It is the Sanborn way.

Share a story/memory of how Harriet has impacted your life: Four years after Hallie was my counselor, my father suddenly passed away.  At the time, I did not have Hallies phone number so I quickly wrote her a letter telling her I needed to talk with her.  I lived in New Jersey, and, Hallie, I believe lived in Oregon at the time.  The day she received the letter, she called me.  And, even though I hadn’t seen her or talked with her, except through letters, in over four years, she was a great source of comfort in, perhaps, the hardest time of my life.  This is a great testament to the bonds formed at Sanborn.  They last long after the days shared at camp.

Harriet was a High Trails staff member in 89′, 90′, 93′ and, most recently, in 2005.  Beyond dressing up in a few stunning prom dresses, Harriet spent a great deal of time  leading trips, swapping stories, and, in 2005, driving the High Trails trash truck.  She also co-authored the High Trails hit song, “Trash Truck” with Taggert MacDonald.   Harriet currently lives in Portland, OR with her daughter Esther.  She works at Alberta Rose Theatre and is addicted to Facebook Scrabble.

In honor of High Trails’ 50th Anniversary this year, the High Trails Blog Project is a way to recognize the High Trails woman (or women) who has made a positive impact on you, your community, or the world over last fifty years.  Please submit your nomination by visiting  the 50 Years of High Trails page on our website.  Thank you for your nominations!

Rafter The Gentle Giant

Friday, January 20th, 2012

Rafter

Color: Red Roan

Gender: Gelding

Breed: Appaloosa Cross

Rafter is a gentle giant who has called Sanborn his home since 1996.  He is one of our biggest horses, yet our smallest campers love to ride him.  Rafter’s got a very calm demeanor and overall mellow attitude.  He also has a very smooth gait when he trots and lopes.  Rafter loves to lounge in the sun on warm afternoons and munch on hay with his fellow “seniors” (our other horses that are 20 years and older).  Our senior horses are often used for Sanborn Junior riders because they have years of experience in safely teaching younger children how to ride.  Rafter’s name comes from his unique brand that he had when he first came to Sanborn.  On a foot note… Rafter has very large hooves!

Rafter usually needs some pretty short stirrups!

Click here for more Tails from the Barn.
Find more Four-Legged Friends here!

Jaunts With Jasper

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Jasper

Color: Chestnut

Gender: Gelding

Breed: Mustang Cross

Jasper is a very talented horse in more than one way.

All his friends call him Houdini for his amazing skills of escaping from any locked gate or corral.  He can also quickly untie a knot no matter how tightly it’s been tied.  Jasper not only frees himself, but he encourages his friends to join him for a little rendezvous.

Jasper also has uncanny swimming skills.  His favorite day in the summer is the Super Wrangler All Day because he gets to pretend to be a very large fish and take campers for a dip in the Witcher Fish Pond.  Lost Lake is another favorite stomping ground of Jasper’s.  He will jump in with campers on his back again and again!

Click here for more Tails from the Barn.
Find more Four-Legged Friends here!

Cowboy Take Me Away

Monday, January 16th, 2012

Cowboy

Color: Bay

Gender: Gelding

Breed: Quarter Horse Cross

Cowboy is a gentle, wise soul who has been at Sanborn for over fifteen years.  He used to be a wrangler horse who loved to pull shenanigans and was always looking for adventures.  Now he is enjoying being more mature and has the experience to get you anywhere around camp – from Top of the World, to Lost Lake, to Fish Creek, to the Big Spring Barn or the High Trails Stables.  Cowboy has his own special saddle with his name right on it because of high withers on his back.  He also has quite the forelock which gives him a Justin Bieber-esk quality.  He could definitely pull off some great karaoke if the situation arose! He and Rafter are best friends and have been for a long long time.

BFFs!

Cowboy sports the Bieb's hairdo

Click here for more Tails from the Barn.
Find more Four-Legged Friends here!

Innovation and Leadership Styles: There is No Single Formula

Monday, January 16th, 2012

Creativity. Innovation. How else will you find the next foothold?

This weekend, the New York Times interviewed Bill Kling, founder and president emeritus of the American Public Media Group, about leadership and the influential lessons of childhood.

Kling appreciates the space and time his parents provided him, as it allowed him to let his imagination run.  He also spent a great deal of time dismantling and reconstructing (and sometimes destroying) radios….perhaps leading to his lifetime interest in radio.  He feels “we often undervalue the importance of giving young kids that kind of hands-on experience. It may not lead to their deciding what to do with their lives, but it’s surprising what they will absorb — and maybe their lives will turn out differently.”

This ability to experiment as a child, and follow one’s passion areas, strengths and skill areas truly add to a person’s leadership potential.  If a child, or young adult, feels he/she has aptitude in an area—he/she will have more confidence.  That said, it is essential that our future leaders understand that they have to try a variety of activities and work with others in order to achieve great things.

Hard work at 13,000 feet

As Kling says, “A mentor of mine taught me that every perspective is additive, because every person sitting in a room is looking at things differently. Each of them has a different perspective. They come from a different way of thinking and different experiences. And their collective perspective gives you a better outcome. So you have to value the perspectives and try to organize those perspectives in some useful way that lets you go forward.”

Our SOLE/CORE programs allow our 8th and 9th grade campers to not only work together and learn to value new perspectives, they also give our campers opportunities to focus on a specific skill set that interests them.  Whether they are rock climbing, expedition backpacking, horseback riding, or mountain biking, the time and effort these campers dedicate to planning, route finding, learning, teaching, and collectively improving (through service projects and mentoring) gives them a depth of experience and a camaraderie that is life-changing.

They discover that their own leadership strengths can compliment the strengths of others, and they also learn that, sometimes, those very strengths need the balance of other ideas in order to find success. They discover inner creativity—sometimes in humorous ways—because they are in such a supportive, “can-do” social environment.  They discover the outdoors to be a very demanding and inflexible teacher, one whose course requires a great deal of preparation, creativity, flexibility, and innovation in order to pass.

And, sometimes, they fail.

Repairing Fence...Building Leadership

Yet as they come down from the rock they didn’t climb, or the mountain they didn’t summit, or the river they couldn’t cross—they are already thinking, wondering, formulating, planning, and talking about how to do it again…and again…and again.  No one on these trips tells anyone “you can’t do it.”  Kling said, “Too often, leaders fail because someone told them they can’t do it. If you don’t know what you can’t do, then you may well achieve it. If you don’t know what you can’t do, then you may well achieve it.”

All of this brings to mind a favorite children’s book, The OK Book by  Amy Krouse Rosenthal.  Childhood is the time to be “OK” at many different things….because you will have the whole rest of your life to become really terrific at something.

Undoubtedly many of our SOLE/CORE participants will go on to become “really terrific” leaders in the fields of their choice….many of them already have.

Banana Suits and Big Things to Come: Thoughts from Big Spring Program Director, David Cumming

Friday, January 13th, 2012

David Cumming, Big Spring Program Director

Well hello there. This is David Cumming, your new Big Spring Program Director at Sanborn Western Camps. I’m extremely excited to be back in action after a summer as a counselor in 2010 and subsequently putting on the overalls and rabbit fur hat as an instructor at High Trails Outdoor Education Center that very fall.

Some of my personal accomplishments include: three-time male champion at Florissant’s annual Thunderbird Figure Skating Competition (I nailed the Half Lutz, but my Open axel was sub-par), Big Spring Nighttime Banana Split Eating Championship (actually I’ve been the only competitor each night … I mean year … I mean, it may or may not take place in my kitchen) and the original Settler of Catan (it was a rough winter for us Catanans, but we pulled through).

But on a somewhat serious note, I hail from the great nation of Florida, and graduated with a degree in journalism and education from the University of Florida, working for newspapers and desperately trying to be Tim Tebow’s friend.  Then I heard about this Colorado place, and it was all over. So for the past year, I was a city slicker up in Denver, working for a non-profit conservation corps along the Front Range doing trail restoration and fire mitigation. During this brief spell, I was able to begin my own after-school outdoor education program, where we brought underprivileged youth on trips to state parks for them to learn about the wild and help build some trails as well. After twelve months of hearing a chain saw buzz in my ears at all hours of the night, I can honestly say that there’s nothing quite like being a citizen of Florissant again.

On International Talk Like a Pirate Day I Climb 14ers...Arrgh!

In my spare time, I have a few writing projects I am working on, and trying to publish my first book (shameless plug)! I also dapple a bit in photography and video, enjoy cooking with family and friends, and am currently trying to nail down vegan bread and dessert baking in such a high altitude (any tips?). I used to be such a jock in my teens (lacrosse, swimming, baseball, surfing, and the occasional beach volleyball (don’t judge me, I was young, and a Floridian)).  Now give me any sport with the words “book” and “club” involved, and I’m there.

Oh, and I have a beard (please don’t make me go solo mustache, as I’ve confirmed with my peers that I just can’t pull it off).

But even more seriously, I am certain that teaching in the outdoors is one of the most significant ways we’re going to keep this world from going lop-sided. I have seen the change first-hand in our campers, our students, and even our counselors (me included) after spending time in the woods. Just a walk among the pines can unlock a universe of possibilities in us. In a place where children are able to just be themselves, to laugh uncontrollably and play freely without worry, and to be still under the stars for the night, they begin to understand just how similar and connected we all really are.

And that right there might change the entire game.

Honestly and truly, it’s an honor to be part of this great leadership team, and I can’t wait until summer gets here.

I’m dry-cleaning the banana suit and sumping a bowl of gravy as I type this.

In the pool,

David

“I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in.” ― John Muir

Ice Gardening

Monday, January 9th, 2012

Ice Gardening...faster than growing beans!

Happy New Year!  We hope everyone had wonderful, outdoor adventures during the holiday break…a number of the year-round staff took to the hills to do some skiing, sledding, running, and snow-cave building while others travelled but made time for wintry botanic gardens, walks around the local lake, feeding the geese, and much more.

Now that school is back in session, we need fun, fast, engaging activities to continue to connect our kids, and ourselves, to the outdoors.  One of our favorites is Ice Gardening.

All you need is a variety of water holding containers, sub-zero temperatures, and a surface on which to arrange your garden.  If your temperatures are REALLY cold (like they are at camp right now), you can fill up the containers at night, pop your ice shapes out in the morning, and refill them before you head to school….and they may be frozen again by the time you get home!

So many possibilities!

Experiment with different sizes and shapes, and remember that you don’t have to fill the containers to the very top!  If you want the ice to stick together, pour a bit of water on one piece, then hold it firmly against the piece you want to attach it to for a few moments…then VOILA!…the two will freeze together.

Once you have your ice garden, make sure you upload a photo of it to our Facebook page…and if it isn’t cold enough where you live to make an ice garden, then send us photos of a favorite outdoor winter activity in your neighborhood (and if it is surfing or beachcombing…expect us to be jealous).

Happy gardening!