News from Camp: February 1, 2016

February 1st, 2016

High Trails Lake has presented us with a whole new level of wintertime fun at camp!

Although we haven’t had a lot of snow this month, our December storms left enough on the ground to keep Big Spring and High Trails very wintery looking. The High Trails Lake is frozen solid and some of the staff have enjoyed ice-skating on our natural “rink”. We may even get a Broomball game together one of these days!

Mike, Elizabeth, and Matthew have enjoyed seeing many of you as they traveled through the Midwest with our digital slide show program. They have appreciated their warm receptions and enthusiasm for the coming summer.

February is a busy month as we prepare for the summer of 2016. A major project throughout the winter is to hire the summer staff—counselors and wranglers, nurses and A.C.s. We are always so proud of the outstanding college men and women who spend their summers contributing enthusiasm, fun, and nurturing leadership for the young people who attend Big Spring, High Trails, and Sanborn Junior. We already have a great group of returning staff lined up and are making careful selections among new applicants now.

The National Convention of the American Camp Association will be held in Atlanta in mid-February, and we will be participating in full force. Jane is the Chairperson for this year’s conference and has been working on an outstanding educational program for many months. Ariella, Elizabeth, and Patrick will be leading educational sessions at the conference, and Jessie is an official photographer for the event. Mike, Matthew, Jeremy, Jalen, Carlotta, Janie, Martie, and Sarah will also be attending the conference. This type of training helps us to stay on top of evolving issues and inspires us to continue to improve our program each summer.

Our maintenance team continues to work on various projects to improve our facilities.  They are finishing up an interior remodel of the Big Spring staff cabins and of the ABC washhouses.  They are also working on interior renovations in the High Trails Lodge.

Maren, Rachel, and Oliver Fisher are hard at work preparing the riding program for next summer and making sure the horses are all ready for their busy season. It won’t be long before we start having new calves at the Witcher Ranch.

We are all excited about the community that is coming together for the summer of 2016 and can’t wait to begin the fun. We are happy to mail our brochure and DVD to anyone interested in camp and to provide references for new families. If camp is in your plans, please let us know soon, as we have several grades in both terms at High Trails and the first term at Big Spring which are filled or near filling. Several terms of Sanborn Junior are also building waiting lists.

News from Camp: January 1, 2016

January 1st, 2016

The icicles are quite the works or art on Old Sunday Rocks.

Happy New Year to all of our friends across the world.  As we reflect on the happy
moments and blessings of 2015, we are so grateful for the wonderful campers, staff
members, friends and alums who are such an important part of our lives.  And, as we look
ahead to 2016, we are especially excited about the friendships and adventures that will
occur at Big Spring, High Trails, and Sanborn Junior next summer.
Mike, Elizabeth, and Matthew will be heading out in mid-January with the new digital
slide show about a summer at Sanborn Western Camps and look forward to seeing many
of you as they tour the Midwest. On January 12, they will visit Denver; beginning
January 23, they will be in Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Tulsa, Oklahoma City and
Santa Fe.  Those of you who are on our mailing list, you will receive information in the mail
and all the details are posted on the website.  It is a great program and takes less than an
hour so plan to join us!
We have a lot of projects underway to make 2016 great!  We are looking at every aspect
of our program and pursuing ways to make it better.  We’re ordering the equipment we
will need and hiring the staff who will become our outstanding counselors, wranglers,
assistant counselors, and ridge leaders next summer.  We have already had an excellent
response from our 2015 staff and are looking forward to working with many of them
again next summer.
Our maintenance crew has already completed a new tent frame and a new yurt deck on
ABC Ridge at Big Spring and many upgrades in the High Trails Lodge. They are
currently working on renovations of the staff cabins and the ABC washhouses at Big
Spring. During the winter, they will continue to work on facility improvement projects at
both camps.
We have a nice layer of snow on the ground right now and are looking forward to more
moisture throughout the winter. The horses are still finding plenty to eat as they
enjoy their winter vacation at Fishcreek. There are still lots of elk and deer around the
ranch as well, and wild turkeys have been spotted from time to time.
Enrollment is well underway for 2016 and several age groups are nearly full. We are
always happy to send our brochure, DVD and references to interested families.
We hope that your holidays have been wonderful and that each of you will have the
happiest New Year ever!

From the Summer Staff Perspective

December 18th, 2015

Camp has an incredible impact on campers, but it also impacts our staff members in equally powerful ways. It allows us to reflect on the impact of our experiences and the strength of connections made during our childhood and adolescence. It gives us a perspective on the challenges of growing up that we don’t experience again until we have children of our own. And, possibly most important, it allows us to see ourselves through the eyes, actions and needs of another. We have incredible staff at Sanborn Western Camps because, as an organization, we ask them to put the needs of the campers before their own. The staff members who remain present and focused on the campers’ development end up being the ones who take away camps’ biggest lesson: how to empathize and care deeply for others–and to hold yourself accountable. As one of our long-time staff members and former campers, Iska Nardie-Warner, shared in her following response on self-reflection, “They will ask similar questions of you, and you might want [to have] your answers ready.”

Camp changes the way girls perceive themselves.

I was writing [this] and ended up getting super nostalgic for camp, the staff, and the campers. Anyway, I just thought I’d share some of what camp has given me these past 3 years mostly because I think that sharing in the moment is cool and not done enough, but also because tis the season you know?


Though I have had many reasons for returning to Sanborn, the opportunity to communicate to young girls the power that comes from living outdoors in a solely female community surely covers the main of it.


Fortunately for me, the past two summers have been spent living and working with the same girls. And I can honestly say that watching each and everyone of those unique, talented, and beautiful young ladies challenge themselves physically, emotionally and grow in themselves has been a blessing. We all remember the challenges of being a fifteen-year old girl and to help these special ladies recognize their connections to (and love for) each other and the strength they build when they rely not only upon themselves but each other as well is making a difference.


Camp changes the way girls perceive themselves. Less and less, you will observe, the girls worry about the need to look or act a specific way: instead, they focus on climbing 14,000 foot mountains, riding horses with control, and most importantly asking questions of the world, themselves. And don’t be fooled, they will ask similar questions of you, and you might want your answers ready.


The power of fifteen-year old girls is undoubtedly underestimated. There is something striking about waking each morning and having to explain yourself and your thoughts and actions, almost immediately, to your girls. Their insatiable curiosity prompts repeated recognition of the importance of self-reflection for a counselor.


Honestly, I cherish explaining why my opinions on the importance of female empowerment provide the drive behind my work as a counselor: Sanborn becomes the intersection of theory and practice, for me, and I only fully-understand that because of self-reflection, sometimes prompted by the intelligent young ladies that populate that camp. In other words, these girls challenge me just as much as I plan on challenging them each summer. And I know they will give me just as much as I am willing to give them.

"And I know they will give me just as much as I am willing to give them." Avery (left), a current camper, with Iska (right) during their long trip in Summer 2015.


I could never take my role in their life lightly, and plan to never take for granted the role they have played in mine either because they really are the most special, funny, witty, charming, intelligent, kind, poised, and lovable young women. I miss them to pieces and know that they will be some of the best JCs and people this world has ever seen. And Sanborn—as a place that changes lives forever (for the better)—would be lucky to have any of them that can return.

Cheers,

Iska

Thank you Iska for sharing your thoughts with us and our greater Camp community. We are so excited to continue impacting each other with our campers and staff members as the New Year approaches and brings Summer 2016 with it.

News from Camp: December 1, 2015

December 1st, 2015
Colorado Turkeys

A few of our Sanborn turkey friends!

Winter cold has crept into the Ranch even though we still have lots of sunny days. Our snow-covered fields are beautiful and it definitely looks like December around here. The animals which have not gone into hibernation have been pretty active in the center of camp. There are always rabbit tracks in the snow, and last week we saw a bobcat right in front of the Big Spring Office. We often see deer in the middle of Big Spring and High Trails. The elk have been hanging out at Potts Spring and there are still a few porcupines waddling around in the dusk. We have spotted our wild Turkey flock almost every day—they must know that this is a safe place to hang out over the holidays.

The office is a fun place to be these days as the elves are all busy getting ready for Christmas, preparing gifts, cards and other holiday mailings. We are keeping UPS and the local post office busy!

Plans are well underway for Mike’s, Matthew’s and Elizabeth’s trip through the Midwest in January. They look forward to meeting camp families, alums, and those who would like to explore the opportunities at camp. We will be sending a mailing in early January with dates and times for the Midwest trip. This information will also be posted on our website. These fun gatherings are a great way to reconnect with camp friends and also provide an opportunity for

Cottontail Rabbit

The Cottontail Rabbits are blending in really well to their surroundings with the snow.

families interested in camp to learn more about our programs.

We have big plans for the winter! This is always a time when we can focus on projects designed to improve our programs and facilities. We’ve already planned and submitted our proposed high mountain and horse trips to the Forest Service for the summer of 2015 and can’t wait to share these amazing adventures with our campers next summer. We will be working on all aspects of our program from crafts to horseback riding to rock climbing to improve and refresh all of our activities.

Our maintenance crew is busy working on projects to improve our facility.  They have built a new tent frame and a deck for a new yurt on ABC Ridge at Big Spring. They are now remodeling the staff cabins at Big Spring and working on interior renovations at the High Trails Lodge.

We are also expanding and improving our staff training, using research that is current in youth development. And, of course, hiring the best counselors and program leaders is one of our major winter projects. Some great staff members have already promised to return!

Boys Old Sunday Rocks

The snow sure creates a different scene than what we see in the summer!

Enrollment for next summer has been flowing in and we are very excited about the communities that are shaping up at Big Spring, High Trails and Sanborn Junior for 2016. Everyone at camp wishes all of our friends the happiest of holiday seasons!

GivingTuesday Gives to CAMP!

November 25th, 2015

Because Camp Matters!

Great news! This year, you can celebrate GivingTuesday on December 1, 2015 by donating to our long-term partner, the John Austin Cheley Foundation. Former and current Sanborn Western Camps campers are participating in a crowdfunding campaign to support their positive camp experiences through Sanborn and the JACF. Check out what Luis Acosta, DJ Shattock, and Luis Ochoa had to say about the impact of their SWC experience (and help them win some cool prizes through JACF!)

Please consider donating to the John Austin Cheley Foundation between now and #GivingTuesday on December 1, 2015–there are matching funds available if you donate between now and December 1. JACF is a non-profit organization that matters to us greatly as we are one of only six Associates Camp for the Foundation.  JACF advances underserved youth towards a successful future by providing camperships to attend Sanborn Western Camps.

Like Sanborn, the JACF believes residential, nature-based summer camp programs help youth grow and develop in ways that prime them for future success.  A growing body of reseach indicates that summer camps foster the outcomes of teamwork, independence, affinity for nature, perceived competence, problem-solving, responsibility and interest in exploration.  These evidence-based outcomes mirror many of the necessary skills that have been identified as critical for today’s youth to thrive in a world in which change is constant and learning never stops.  It’s why the John Austin Cheley’s tagline reads, “Because Camp Matters.”


JACF invests in its campers by funding the cost for tuition, travel and equipment, which averages close to $5,000 a summer.  It is also committed to funding a camper for the full lifespan of the camper’s year’s at camp to ensure impact.  By donating between now and December 1, you can also maximize the impact of our contributions through matching funds available for every new dollar (new or increased donations) raised.

You can learn more and contribute to JACF’s #ExpandingOurImpact-GivingTuesday crowdfunding campaigns developed through www.FundRazr.com.  Simply, search for the John Austin Cheley Foundation and they will pop up. We encourage our campers, staff and alums to support our former campers “campaigns.” These donations will help the JACF foundation, JACF campers, and Sanborn Western Camps create a rich, unique and varied camp experience for our campers.

Thanks so much for considering becoming a part of #GivingTuesday, a global day of philanthropy on December 1, 2015, and for supporting our relationship with the John Austin Cheley Foundation.

Join us in sharing our campaign with your friends, family and connections and by donating now through December 1, 2015 to remove the barriers for underserved youth to this life-changing opportunity. For more information, go to our website at www.cheleyfoundation.org.

The Joy of Campfires

November 12th, 2015

"The brilliance, the warmth, the crackle of the logs…it brought new life to our cold campsite."

There are so many magnificent things about summer camp, and for me one of the greatest of them is the opportunity to sit around a campfire.  Not a gas flame flickering, not a warming lamp on a restaurant patio… but a campfire.

The first campfire I experienced was at Sanborn, and it was love at first sight.  I was a camper on my first unit overnight, far from home.  I was tired from a long hike in wet weather, my feet and shoulders were aching, and a cold front was rolling in behind the rain. But then the counselors built a campfire.  And all of those tiresome things melted away. I couldn’t believe how incredible it was to just stare at the rolling flames.

The mood lifted as campers and staff gathered around.  We gazed at the fire, transfixed by the vines of light tangling in the air.  The brilliance, the warmth, the crackle of the logs…it brought new life to our cold campsite.  There was something mystic about those flames.  It felt like a message from the earth, from nature itself, an encouraging note of warmth and energy.

Throughout that evening, campers and counselors stayed near the fire, working together to prepare dinner.  We chopped and grilled, cooking right over the blaze.  There wasn’t a stove in sight, we literally cooked over the fire.  It felt timeless, as if we were engaged in an ancient task.  I still remember that meal, it’s one of the best dinners of my life.  And not because it was well made, which it was, but because the entire meal was cooked on an open fire.  It lit up my mood and filled up my belly.

"We chopped and grilled, cooking right over the blaze."

That campfire was a first for me, and summer camp is all about firsts.  Spending a night or two out in the wilderness can be scary, but a campfire can chase away those fears.  It’s a process that humans have been doing for eons.

The human race has a special relationship with campfires.  It’s a ritual of light, a safe zone of warmth and community.  Gazing into a the flames, we connect to our past.  For thousands of years our ancestors sat around fires, not for fun, but for necessity.  Human history began by the firelight.  When we build campfires, it brings a taste of the timeless into our cluttered modern world.

It’s essential to be safe when building a fire.  At Sanborn, we don’t have fires all the time, we only build when conditions permit.  Sometimes there are fire bans, other times we’re in National Forest or high country and we simply don’t want to impact the surroundings.  But when we do build campfires, it’s truly wonderful.  A campfire can warm a day and bond a group.  Gazing into the flames inspires you in ways that are hard to describe.  The flames roll and your thoughts roll with them.

Years ago, that night around the fire, the meal finished but we kept the flames going.  We roasted marshmallows and sang along with an untuned guitar.  The flames twisted up into the night with our laughter in tow.  I looked across the fire, into the eyes of my new friends.  The campfire underscored the mood, it was a shared love of the moment.  With each pop from the fire, sparks floated up into the sky, mixing with the stars.  I felt so… connected.

As the night ended, the flames fell into coals and the embers pulsed like a heartbeat.   One by one, everyone headed off to bed, zipping into their tents and bags.  I sat alone with a few others, poking at the embers. Finally, the counselors put the fire out with a crash of cold water.  Steam hissed up into the night, the light fading away.  It was time for bed.

I always sleep like a rock after sitting around a campfire.  It’s almost like the flames were a lullaby for my busy mind.  And then there’s the fun of the next day… because one of the great things about a campfire is that it stays with you.  The next morning you can smell the campfire in your clothes, an aroma of smoke, an echo of nighttime fun.  More than once, I’ve been caught standing stock-still, sniffing my clothes and smiling, remembering the flawless joy of a campfire.

News from Camp: November 1, 2015

November 1st, 2015

We've had a couple beautiful snows already!

We have had a long and beautiful Indian Summer, with golden and red aspen trees lasting into late October.  The temperatures are dropping a bit now and the mornings are chilly, but the sun is creating a lot of warmth during the day.  We had one snowstorm in late October—it left about 3 inches which quickly melted.

Our maintenance crew has made excellent use of the good weather and is building a new tent frame and a foundation for a new yurt on ABC Ridge at Big Spring.  They have also finished new roofs on Red Cloud, Massive and the Crafts Building at BS. Their winter projects include renovations on the ABC Washhouses at Big Spring, and additional work on the interior of the High Trails Lodge.  They will also build a new “Welcome” gate at High Trails to match the new gate they finished in September for Big Spring.

Maren reports that the horses are very happy grazing in Fish Creek. They have appreciated taking it easy and munching sweet mountain grass to their heart’s content after their busy summer in the Big Spring and High Trails Riding programs.

We will be again be hosting the American Camp Association—Rocky Mountain Region Annual workshop in mid-November.  Attended by camp leaders from several states, this is a wonderful educational and networking opportunity and many of our year round staff will be attending and, in some cases, presenting programs. High Trails Director Elizabeth Rundle is a member of the Local Counsel of Leaders, and has been very involved in planning the conference..

We are all looking forward to the relative calm of the winter season and the opportunity it provides to improve our programs and our facilities. We met last week to select dates for some of our exceptional trips next summer.  These include four- and five-day backpacking trips on Mts. Elbert and Massive, Mts. Harvard and Yale, Pikes Peak, the Colorado Trail, Buffalo Peaks, the Tarryall Mountains and several more spectacular wilderness areas.  We will also plan mountain climbing trips to Mt. Huron, Mt. Ouray, Mt. Oxford and Belford, La Plata Peak, Mt. Quandary, Mt. Democrat, Mt. Princeton and ten more Colorado “Fourteeners”.  We are already anticipating the fun and challenge of these amazing adventures.

Mike is looking forward to visiting Austin this week with our first camp road show of the season. Elizabeth, Mike and Matthew are also planning their January trip to the Midwest. Details will be on our website as soon as they are available.

Many of you have received enrollment information in the past month, and we are always happy to send our brochure and DVD to new families.  We offer an early bird tuition discount for enrollments we receive before December 1. We have already received a significant number of enrollments for 2016 and are excited to watch the High Trails and Big Spring communities take shape.

Have a very Happy Thanksgiving!

We agree – Camp is Magic

October 23rd, 2015

Facing challenges that seem impossible at the time is part of the Magic of camp.

Maybe being this far back in the forest you would think that it’s hard for the News to reach us, but we do appreciate those of you who help keep us connected to what’s new and trending, and we will never pass up a great article about the Magic and Purpose of Camp! So when this article from the Huffington Post by Kelly Newsome was passed along to Jane by a couple of alums, it quickly made its way around the office and now up on the blog and back out to you, who we have a feeling will appreciate it as much as we did!

We know from first-hand experience that the thoughts Ms. Newsome expresses about how camp shaped her as a person are very real. Camp is an environment where individual growth and self-understanding occur in a way that seems magical. It does not matter where or which camp you attended as a child or worked at in your young adult years or came back to for an Alum Reunion.

The Magic of camp can happen in as short a time frame as a weekend.

And that is where this article struck me as so true. We just enjoyed the camp alum reunion to celebrate our 67th year, and welcomed nearly 50 over-excited “children” (as Ms. Newsome so aptly put it).  The excitement in the lodge on Thursday night was palpable. Pre-historic through present aged camp alum immediately blended together into a new camp community. All weekend they enjoyed together the activities that make up so many happy memories from camp days.

My favorite part of the reunions though are the stories told during meals and “rest time” on the deck. The stories of great adventures, favorite counsellors and campers, and most especially the challenging moments! Just as Ms. Newsome said, “After lice outbreaks, soiled linens, projectile vomiting, and shrill screams in the wee hours of the morning, getting splashed by an oncoming bus on the way to class or stepping in dog poop at the park just doesn’t take a toll on my happiness the way it once did.”

We all have those stories of the great mountain climbs and perfect 5-day horse trips that we look back on fondly, but it’s not these stories that get told with minute-by-minute details and pride in all the sheer will-power it took to boil water in a torrential Colorado downpour. It’s the challenges we all faced, and overcame, that turn into the stories that are now told and reflected on as being the best. You were challenged by Nature, by very-tired distraught campers, by a mountain with 14 false peaks. You struggled, worked as a team, and overcame the worst of the situation to pull through and return triumphant! Those are the memories that you hold dear and those are the times that shaped you into the strong confident human being you are now.  These are the magic moments – and yes, for those of you who are currently campers, this is happening for you too!

The world is changing out there (we do venture out of our forest home enough to know that). It is continuing to become a place of diversified challenges and struggles. Yet, we know that what we’ve done here for the past 67 years and the challenges we continue to embrace, are still helping to grow and shape us into the very best humans we can be. The humans that will take Camp out into the world and “redefine magic” there as well.

Find Kelly Newsome’s article The Magic of Summer Camp here.

News from Camp: October 1, 2015

October 1st, 2015

We are enjoying spectacular Indian Summer days here at camp. The golden Aspen are at their peak and are stunning against the bright blue sky. We’ve been spying on the herd of elk at Potts Spring and have also seen deer, porcupines, wild turkeys, bobcats, and, of course, the fat black Abert squirrels. Many of our summer birds have headed south and the year-round bird residents are beginning to show up at our feeders more regularly.

Everyone at camp had a great time watching the lunar eclipse on September 27. It was a spectacular show from our location, and bugling elk in the background made it a night to remember!

Our outdoor education program with sixth graders from District 20 in Colorado Springs has been underway since mid-September. We also hosted a “No Child Left Inside” open house September 19 and were very happy to have many local families join us for a morning of hikes and nature-based activities led by our staff. We are very committed to doing everything we can to help young people connect with the natural world. The benefits are enormous—as Richard Louv, author of “Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder” says: “Children who have a personal connection with nature are happier, healthier, and smarter.”

At The Nature Place, Rob Jolly and his staff are busy working with the University of Denver on a team-building and leadership development program for DU’s MBA students. We have collaborated with DU on this program, where every MBA student spends a long weekend at The Nature Place, for over 15 years. The students rock climb, participate in an orienteering course, and work through many team-building scenarios, all of which teach values-based leadership.

The horses are grazing happily in Fishcreek where they are exceptionally appreciative of the lush green grass. They miss taking rides every day with their many friends but are already looking forward to next summer.

We are most excited about opening enrollment for another season of camp. The summer of 2016 will be our 68th and we are looking forward to sharing adventures, friendships and lots of fun. We have already begun enrollment, and additional enrollment information will be going out throughout the month of October. If you know of interested families, we’ll be happy to send our brochure and DVD. They can also request information from our website.

We hope you are having a fantastic Autumn!

News from Camp: September 1st, 2015

September 4th, 2015

Don't worry...This Window, That Window and The Other Window signs will be back!

It is much too quiet around camp   The fields, hills, and lodges are filled with great memories from the summer of 2015, and we are grateful to have had the opportunity to spend this time with so many outstanding campers and staff.

One of our tasks during the weeks following camp is to collect and distribute all the lost and found items.  We have now mailed every major article which has a name to the owner.  We still have some jackets, boots, and other items of clothing which do not have names.  Please let us know if your camper is missing something and we will do everything we can to track it down and send it to you.

Our outdoor education program staff has arrived and we will begin welcoming sixth graders to High Trails Outdoor Education Center on September 8.  Among the summer staff who have returned to teach during this program are Mike Adler, Janie Cole, Melody Reeves, Jared Allen, Anne Ulizio, Nick Jordan, and Jalen Bazile. Patrick Perry, Carlotta Avery, Sarah Ulizio, and Jackson Blackburn will provide leadership for the program.

An outstanding hay crew consisting of Jim Larsen, Joe Lopez, Ian Stafford, Matthew Huffman, and Anne Shingler has been working hard to bring in our hay crop this year. The cattle and horses are very grateful for their work because the hay will provide their nourishment through the winter months.

Our maintenance crew has been busy since camp ended. They have completed a beautiful new over the road sign at the entrance to Big Spring and have almost finished a big job at the High Trails Lodge—installing new electricity, new paneling, and new windows. We think it will be a big hit with all the High Trails diners.

We have several exciting events this Fall in addition to our traditional schedule.  On September 4 we will be providing leadership training for students from School District 20 high schools.  We have developed this outstanding program over the past few years and are always excited to work with these motivated teens. And on September 19, we will again join with the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument to celebrate “No Child Left Inside Day” by hosting an open house.  We will be offering a program of nature-based activities and hikes for families who would like to get their children outdoors for the day.  There is no cost for the event.  We also have an Alum Reunion planned for October 15-18, and are looking forward to welcoming many old friends back to camp.

We are already thinking about next summer and have established our dates.  The first term at Big Spring and High Trails will be Sunday, June 12 – Tuesday, July 12, 2016. The second term will be Friday, July 15 – Sunday, August 14.  The four terms of Sanborn Junior will be June 12 – June 26, June 28 – July 12, July 15 – July 29, and July 31 -August 14.  We have sent this information to current camp families and will send additional information in October to camp families, former camp families, and prospective camp families. If you would like to receive our catalog and DVD or know someone who would, we will be happy to mail them at any time.

Each month we will post news from camp on the website, so keep checking it out!  Right now, a few gold leaves are showing on the Aspen, and the sky is incredibly blue.  A large herd of elk is hanging out at Potts Spring and the horses are wondering why no one comes each day to ride them.  We wish all of our camp friends a great beginning to the school year and hope that everyone will keep in touch.